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Colloquium

Fall 2022 Colloquia will be held in Room 307 of the Science and Engineering Research Facility (unless slated as virtual in the schedule below) on Mondays at 3:30 PM, EST.

Fall Colloquium Chair, Yuri Kamyshkov (kamyshkov@utk.edu)
Colloquium Fall 2022 Calendar


Colloquium Archives
Fall 2022 Schedule
Date
Speaker
Title
Host

August 29

Nadia Fomin
UT Physics

Don't stand so close to me - a story of short-range nuclear repulsion

Yuri Kamyshkov

September 5

Labor Day Holiday

No Colloquium

 

September 12

Steve Johnston
UT Physics

Intertwined spin, charge, and pair correlations in the two-dimensional Hubbard model

Yuri Kamyshkov

September 19

Haidong Zhou
UT Physics
Slides

The search and detection of quantum spin liquid in new materials with geometrically frustrated lattice

Yuri Kamyshkov

September 26

Christine Nattrass
UT Physics

Quantifying properties of liquid nuclei

Yuri Kamyshkov

October 3

Bronson Messer
Oak Ridge National Laboratory

TBA

Raph Hix

October 10

TBA

TBA

 

October 17

Peter Lepage
Cornell University

TBA

Lucas Platter

October 24

TBA

TBA

 

October 31

TBA

TBA

 

November 7

Bernd Rosenow
University of Leipzig

TBA

Adrian Del Maestro

November 14

Sarah Demers
Yale University

TBA

Larry Lee

November 21

TBA

TBA

 

November 28

W. Michael Snow
Indiana University

TBA

Yuri Kamyshkov

December 5

Minsu Kim
Emory University

TBA

Jaan Mannik


Abstracts

August 29 | Nadia Fomin, UT Physics
Don't stand so close to me - a story of short-range nuclear repulsion

Much of what we know about high-energy components of nuclear structure comes from recent measurement campaigns at Jefferson Lab. Experiments from the 6 GeV era have provided precise results about short-range nucleon-nucleon correlations and their nuclear dependence. Additionally, an intriguing correlation was observed to measurements of modifications of nuclear quark distributions (EMC effect). I will highlight key insights gained from previous measurements (including recent ones) and present future experiments aimed at further illuminating these exotic components of nuclear structure.


September 12 | Steve Johnston, UT Physics
Intertwined spin, charge, and pair correlations in the two-dimensional Hubbard model

Understanding the physics of the high-temperature superconducting cuprates remains a grand challenge for condensed matter physics. The central difficulty here is that the cuprates host a rich set of novel magnetic and charge correlations that can compete/cooperate with superconductivity in ways that are not yet fully understood. In recent years, state-of-the-art nonpertubative numerical calculations for the single-band Hubbard model, a minimal model for the cuprates, have observed similar behavior with several nearly degenerate states closely competing for the ground state. This talk will discuss such numerical studies, including our recent work accessing these physics in the thermodynamic limit, where we find evidence for novel pair-density-wave correlations intertwined with the stripe correlations. I will also discuss how perturbations like the electron-lattice interaction can alter the balance between these competing orders.


September 19 | Haidong Zhou, UT Physics

Slides

The search and detection of quantum spin liquid in new materials with geometrically frustrated lattice

While the rise of quantum computers may one day help solve complex problems and deliver information with unhackable security, there is lack of a material platforms for scalable realization of quantum technologies. For instance, the most interesting magnetic property of the celebrated quantum spin liquids (QSLs) is the possibility of quantum mechanical encryption and transport of information, protected against environmental influences. Despite extensive studies on QSLs, they are still far away from applications. First obstacle is simply the shortage of real examples of QSL systems. Second obstacle is that most of the studied QSLs are insulators and electronically inert, which is incompatible with an electrical circuit that relies on moving charge carriers. The grand challenge is to find a way to convert the entanglement information into mobile charge signal by "metallizing" quantum magnets.

In this talk, I will introduce a unique approach by using strategical materials design focusing on geometrically frustrated magnets to address these two obstacles. First, we search for QSL in new spin-1/2 triangular lattice antiferromagnets. The two examples are Na2BaCo(PO4)2 and YbMgGaO4. Second, we explore how to electronically detect the spin sates and spin excitations in newly designed heterostructures based on pyrochlore lattice. The two examples are Dy2Ti2O7/Bi2Ir2O7 and Yb2Ti2O7/Bi2Ir2O7.

I will also introduce the crystal growth techniques used to synthesize these systems since the materials growth is the starting point of materials research and the high quality samples are essential to learn their intrinsic properties.


September 26 | Christine Nattrass, UT Physics
Quantifying properties of liquid nuclei

At energy densities above about 1 GeV/fm^3 QCD predicts a phase transition in nuclear matter to a plasma of quarks and gluons. This matter, called a Quark Gluon Plasma (QGP), has different properties from normal nuclear matter due to its high temperature and density and can be created in high energy nuclear collisions. Measurements at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) on Long Island and the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) in Geneva allow studies of nucleus-nucleus collisions over two orders of magnitude in center of mass energy. I will discuss how we can measure the properties of the QGP, even though the liquid produced in these collisions only lives around 10^{-23} seconds, and how we get the most out of those data. I will also discuss incorporation of undergraduates in these studies in a Course-based Undergraduate research experience (CURE). This provides a valuable educational experience for undergraduates while also assisting collaborations and the field with data preservation and comparisons to models. CUREs are a useful tool for increasing research opportunities in the department, increasing diversity in the field, and improving retention in the major.


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